Timeframe Guesstimate

In the interest of not dragging you through the insanely tedious details I will post a chart. If, per chance, you would prefer clarity in a certain area then feel free to ask. This information is what I could gather from the lawyer. Bottom line is that we do not have the assignment yet. That will happen anywhere from 2 weeks to 2 months from now. God grant me grace… The big frustration before stemmed from the two conflicting messages I was getting from the lawyer and social services. Seeing as the lawyer has been in this for 14 years (longer than the social service people) I am going to base these trajectories on her sobering, frank and more realistic word.

The date projections lie anywhere between the short end and the long end. I cannot stress to you enough the word ANYWHERE. I understand that this could all be flip flopped and mixed around like scrambled eggs at any moment. Just having it in an organized semblance helps me, no matter how fleeting this moment of feigned control is. Dates are guesstimates starting August 1.

Action

Duration of days

Date

short-end

Date

high-end

Papers to judge’s desk

7 to 12

Aug. 7

Aug. 12

Packet in judge’s hands to first court appearance

14 to 60

Aug. 21

Oct. 12

Court appearance at which the assigned child’s history is read and they show us photos of her. We accept the assignment.

1

Aug. 24

Oct. 13

We visit her at the home she is staying at within 3 days of the assignment

3

Aug. 27

Oct. 16

Report is given to the judge’s office about our first visit

7

Sept. 3

Oct. 23

A second court appearance is scheduled

1 to 14

Sept. 4

Nov. 6

The second court appearance where we take the girl home for a 15 day “convivencia” (living together time) during which the social service team will evaluate the family bonding

1

Sept. 7

Nov. 9

“Convivencia” with our daughter in our home

15

Oct. 2

Nov. 24

Third court appearance at which the social service team presents their findings of the initial transition and the judge declares one of two things

  1. The termination of the adoption and she goes back to the home she was in
  2. The approval of the adoption and we take her home!!!

1

Oct. 5

Nov. 25

After all the adoption stuff is done we then begin the name change here in Bolivia and obtain U.S. citizenship and a passport. To do all that for Tyler took us 10 weeks – and we were pushing to get it done. I imagine it will take about the same amount of time for our new daughter, too. That means we will be travel ready some time between December 14, 2009 and February 3, 2010.

signature2

Action

Duration of days

Date

short-end

Date

high-end

Papers to judge’s desk

7 to 12

Aug. 7

Aug. 12

Packet in judge’s hands to first court appearance

14 to 60

Aug. 21

Oct. 12

Court appearance at which the assigned child’s history is read and they show us photos of her. We accept the assignment.

1

Aug. 24

Oct. 13

We visit her at the home she is staying at within 3 days of the assignment

3

Aug. 27

Oct. 16

Report is given to the judge’s office about our first visit

7

Sept. 3

Oct. 23

A second court appearance is scheduled

1 to 14

Sept. 4

Nov. 6

The second court appearance where we take the girl home for a 15 day “convivencia” (living together time) during which the social service team will evaluate the family bonding

1

Sept. 7

Nov. 9

“Convivencia” with our daughter in our home

15

Oct. 2

Nov. 24

Third court appearance at which the social service team presents their findings of the initial transition and the judge declares one of two things

1. The termination of the adoption and she goes back to the home she was in

2. The approval of the adoption and we take her home!!!

1

Oct. 5

Nov. 25

9 thoughts on “Timeframe Guesstimate

  1. I pray “Grace, grace” over your timeline and continue to ask for favor, wisdom, peace and comfort. As this seemingly never ending lesson in patience endures, I also pray that God will give you fun times with your current family and that in an essence, time seems to fly!

    I do believe that after all this, you could possibly write an award winning book on patience!! :o)

    Big, big hugs!
    Livvy Lu

    1. Learning patience is like learning to drive. You can a person that hs all the book knowledge of how a car works, how to operate it and even what all the traffic regulations are. Then you have a teenager who has never read one page of any kind of driving rule book who sneaks out after curfew, sits behind the wheel, sticks the keys in, turns the engine over and gets himself to the party that he was forbidden to go to. Who is the driver? The head knowledge counts for diddly squat if you are not actually doing something with it. And if you are out there doing it you can overrule the head knowledge.

      These, of course, are very base generalizations and an incomplete analogy. My point is that you don’t have patience (nor do you need patience) until you are in a taxing situation. Then, when you are thrown into the situation you have to trust that God is going to help you to have whatever guts you need to get through, be it guts of patience, faith, joy, courage or whatever.

      If I did write a book centered around this process it would have to be about having the inward character to advance and not retreat when the going gets rough. I would have to look for a title without the word ‘patience’ in it, too. That just makes it sound like a gruesome book to read! :-) Unless it had humorous overtones like ‘God Give Me Patience, NOW!’.

      Thank you for your prayers, Livvy Lu, and your never tiring encouragement. You are a dear.

    1. The complications vary depending on who you go through and what country you are adopting from. Most international adoptions of Bolivian children take an average of four years to process. Talk about persistence! I also know of many families in the States that have waited about the same amount of time to adopt from other foreign nations. There are some countries that are more open to international adoptions, thus have a smoother process and it goes quicker.

      We really are blessed to be treated as nationals and have a relatively quick process. For foreigners living in Bolivia less than five years they are treated not as nationals, rather as international citizens with a Bolivian residency and their process is at least doubled in comparison to ours.

      For my unique situation compared to a U.S. citizen residing in the U.S. doing an international adoption I think what makes it “complicated” is the close proximity to the workings. Being physically involved in the whole rigmarole is very exhausting. Whereas those in the U.S. don’t see all this happening first hand (even though it is going on through liaisons). So for those in the States (or any other cross national adoption family) there frustrations come form not knowing and being so far away and “out of control” of the process.

      It is like a penny held close to your eye. When it is close to your eye it looks huge and blocks your view of anything else. It is comparatively enormous! Seeing it down in a gutter some distance from your eye it looks tiny. The value of the penny doesn’t change, just our perspective of it. Taking this analogy one step further it is just as frustrating and annoying to have a penny in your eye as it is to not be able to reach it in the gutter.

  2. I’m praying for you sweet Angie, I admire you and I’m sure the time to come will be as sweet as you are to others, you will enjoy having your little girl at home and I agree, you could write an award winning book on Patience. Blessings amiga!

  3. Hey Angie, I see that things continue to go forward with your adoption! Since we are considering international adoption from our country of residence also, I was wondering if you could email about the estimated costs of your process.

  4. Wow. Okay, so I was a little hasty posting on the update before I read this one. :) ‘Right on schedule’ is a very loose concept … hopefully these things won’t take longer than the longest estimate!!! Wow. I’m glad you made a chart, though. I’m sure that relaxes you somewhat. :D

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